Southern giant petrels as indicators of ocean surface currents

Petrels as indicators of surface currents

Authors

  • Megan Cimino Institute of Marine Science, University of California Santa Cruz, 1156 High St, Santa Cruz, CA 95064, USA https://orcid.org/0000-0002-1715-2903
  • Carlos Moffat School of Marine Science and Policy, University of Delaware, 210 South College Ave., Newark, DE 19716, USA https://orcid.org/0000-0002-7768-8275

DOI:

https://doi.org/10.15641/bo.1503

Abstract

A southern giant petrel was satellite tracked during a long foraging trip. While presumably at rest on the sea surface, the giant petrel drifted in a counterclockwise corkscrew pattern that is characteristic of an inertial oscillation in the Southern Ocean. This note demonstrates that tracking data from resting seabirds, like giant petrels, can be used as passive drifters to estimate ocean surface currents in a notoriously stormy environment where data near the air-sea interface is difficult to obtain.

 

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Published

2024-06-10

How to Cite

Cimino, M., & Moffat, C. (2024). Southern giant petrels as indicators of ocean surface currents: Petrels as indicators of surface currents . Biodiversity Observations, 14, 71–74. https://doi.org/10.15641/bo.1503

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Articles