Use of sodium dodecyl sulfate to improve tuberculosis sputum smear microscopy

  • Yéya dit Sadio Sarro University of Sciences, Techniques and Technologies of Bamako (USTTB), Bamako, Mali https://orcid.org/0000-0001-5883-7688
  • Ousmane Kodio University of Sciences, Techniques and Technologies of Bamako (USTTB), Bamako, Mali https://orcid.org/0000-0002-2202-5474
  • Alisha Kumar Northwestern University, Chicago, Illinois, USA
  • Bassirou Diarra University of Sciences, Techniques and Technologies of Bamako (USTTB), Bamako, Mali https://orcid.org/0000-0002-1795-9379
  • Bocar Baya University of Sciences, Techniques and Technologies of Bamako (USTTB), Bamako, Mali
  • Seydou Diabate University of Sciences, Techniques and Technologies of Bamako (USTTB), Bamako, Mali
  • Bourahima Kone University of Sciences, Techniques and Technologies of Bamako (USTTB), Bamako, Mali
  • Fanta Sanogo University of Sciences, Techniques and Technologies of Bamako (USTTB), Bamako, Mali
  • Mohamed Tolofoudie University of Sciences, Techniques and Technologies of Bamako (USTTB), Bamako, Mali
  • Amadou Somboro University of Sciences, Techniques and Technologies of Bamako (USTTB), Bamako, Mali
  • Gagni Coulibaly University of Sciences, Techniques and Technologies of Bamako (USTTB), Bamako, Mali
  • Boureima Degoga University of Sciences, Techniques and Technologies of Bamako (USTTB), Bamako, Mali
  • Mahamadou Kone University of Sciences, Techniques and Technologies of Bamako (USTTB), Bamako, Mali
  • Bindongo PP Dembele University of Sciences, Techniques and Technologies of Bamako (USTTB), Bamako, Mali
  • Issiaka Camara University of Sciences, Techniques and Technologies of Bamako (USTTB), Bamako, Mali https://orcid.org/0000-0001-7534-3057
  • Moumine Sanogo University of Sciences, Techniques and Technologies of Bamako (USTTB), Bamako, Mali
  • Antime C.G Togo University of Sciences, Techniques and Technologies of Bamako (USTTB), Bamako, Mali
  • Nadie Coulibaly University of Sciences, Techniques and Technologies of Bamako (USTTB), Bamako, Mali
  • Fatimata Diallo University of Sciences, Techniques and Technologies of Bamako (USTTB), Bamako, Mali
  • Etienne Dembele Northwestern University, Chicago, Illinois, USA
  • Brehima Diakite University of Sciences, Techniques and Technologies of Bamako (USTTB), Bamako, Mali
  • Seydou Doumbia University of Sciences, Techniques and Technologies of Bamako (USTTB), Bamako, Mali
  • Oluwatoyin P. Popoola University of Lagos, Lagos, Nigeria https://orcid.org/0000-0001-5438-2807
  • Souleymane Diallo University of Sciences, Techniques and Technologies of Bamako (USTTB), Bamako, Mali
  • Jane Louise Holl Northwestern University, Chicago, Illinois, USA https://orcid.org/0000-0002-2934-1672
  • Chad J Achenbach Northwestern University, Chicago, Illinois, USA https://orcid.org/0000-0003-4847-7249
  • Robert Leo Murphy Northwestern University, Chicago, Illinois, USA https://orcid.org/0000-0003-3936-2052
  • Sally McFall Northwestern University, Chicago, Illinois, USA https://orcid.org/0000-0001-5554-6615
  • Mamoudou Maiga Northwestern University, Chicago, Illinois, USA; University of Sciences, Techniques and Technologies of Bamako (USTTB), Bamako, Mali https://orcid.org/0000-0001-7871-3973

Abstract

Sputum smear microscopy (SSM), the most widely available tool for tuberculosis (TB) detection, has limited performance in paucibacillary patients and requires highly experienced technicians. The objective of this study was to determine whether the addition of sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS), a detergent that thins sputum, at 4% and 10%, improves the detection of acid-fast bacilli (AFB), the clarity of slides, and the biosafety of the technique. Thirty participants with presumptive TB were enrolled. Three independent, blinded technicians examined the slides. Regular sputum concentrated AFB smear and sputum culture were used as standard control methods. Sputum culture was also performed before and after 10% SDS addition for safety analysis. We found that neither SSM with SDS 4% nor SSM with SDS 10% improved the test’s performance. However, slides with 4% and 10% SDS, compared with slides prepared without SDS, had significantly better clarity scores. The 10% SDS-prepared sputum samples were all culture negative. While adding SDS detergent does not improve the performance of SSM slides, it does improve the clarity and biosafety. Where experienced technicians are scarce, especially in low resource settings, use of SDS may enhance the ease of slide reading in sputum smear microscopy.

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Published
2019-11-26
How to Cite
Sarro, Y. dit S., Kodio, O., Kumar, A., Diarra, B., Baya, B., Diabate, S., Kone, B., Sanogo, F., Tolofoudie, M., Somboro, A., Coulibaly, G., Degoga, B., Kone, M., Dembele, B. P., Camara, I., Sanogo, M., Togo, A. C., Coulibaly, N., Diallo, F., Dembele, E., Diakite, B., Doumbia, S., Popoola, O. P., Diallo, S., Holl, J. L., Achenbach, C. J., Murphy, R. L., McFall, S., & Maiga, M. (2019). Use of sodium dodecyl sulfate to improve tuberculosis sputum smear microscopy . Global Health Innovation, 2(2). https://doi.org/10.15641/ghi.v2i2.824
Section
Research articles